ROCKLAND — Kailey Murphy loves ice skating, just like her grandmother.

And when the 16-year-old glided across the ice, dancing to the 1970s classic jam, “Summer Nights,” some found it hard not to think of her grandmother, Katy Hayden, who had been recently diagnosed with Stage 4 cancer.

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Hayden is the founder of the Winterettes, the Rockland synchronized ice skating team, which held its first practices of the season Monday at Rockland Ice Rink. Murphy, her granddaughter, is one of the team’s oldest members.

To honor Hayden, the Winterettes added a new component to practice: giving back to those in need.

Hayden was a foster parent so instead of additional time to work on a new routine or skill, the Winterettes spent part of Monday’s practice creating decorative bags for foster children, who are usually forced to carry their belongings in plastic trash bags when they move from home to home.

The older skaters, ages 10 and above, will stuff the bags with school supplies, toiletries, and other emergency items after a shopping trip.

A representative from the state Department of Children and Families will pick up the bags Thursday.

Winterettes member Alexa Parham, 16, copied the Bruins logo onto a  duffle bag during 
practice Monday in Rockland.

Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff

Winterettes member Alexa Parham, 16, copied the Bruins logo onto a duffle bag during
practice Monday in Rockland.

‘You can’t always win, but there’s other things you can do [that will] always make you a winning team.’

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The group plans to continue making the bags for DCF throughout the skating season, which officially begins in September.

“Skating is a privilege, and sometimes you can lose sight of how lucky you really are,” said Mary Sullivan, the Winterettes’ skating director, who succeeded Hayden.

“You can’t always win, but there’s other things you can do [that will] always make you a winning team,” she said. “Plus, [Hayden] is a foster mom so we thought it was great. ”

Because of her family’s experience, Murphy said she recognized the importance of helping others. “I like that we’re giving back and helping,” Murphy said. “I think it was a great idea.”

The community service event was a collaboration between the Winterettes, their parents, and Together We Rise, a nonprofit dedicated to improving the lives of children in foster care.

According to its website, the nonprofit provides thousands of foster youth across the country with new bicycles, college supplies, and suitcases “so that children do not have to travel from home to home with their belongings in a trash bag.”

At Monday’s practice, Winterettes of all ages used pastel crayons to color a blue duffel bag.

The younger skaters, ages 10 and below, colored stencil cutouts of penguins, rainbows, and Hello Kitty.

“I want the kids to be happy. And know that they’ll be safe and OK,” 9-year-old Rosaleigh Carter said.

Elle Blahut, 9, said the thought of kids putting their belongings in a trash bag made her sad.

“I hope they like the bags,” she said. “At my school they talk about friendship. I just want them to be happy.”

Skaters with Rockland’s Winterettes decorated duffle bags that will be used by foster children to hold their belongings when they have to relocate.

Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff

Skaters with Rockland’s Winterettes decorated duffle bags that will be used by foster children to hold their belongings when they have to relocate.

The older students also hoped their small gesture would make an impact.

“You’re one in a minion,” read Olivia Parham’s decorative bag, adorned with an image of the popular minions from the film, “Despicable Me.”

But the connection to Hayden was not lost on the skaters’ parents.

“Katy was like the matriarch here. And she has built something here that we want to continue. She’s given so much to our kids,” said Julianne Flynn, who has one daughter on the Winterettes.

“I want my kids to understand that being supportive and having a sense of community is an important thing to always have in mind.”

Gina Golden, who has two daughters on the team, was not surprised the girls and their parents rallied around Hayden.

“There is a sense of community here,” she said. “There’s a commitment to each other and I’m excited to be a part of that.”

Kailey Murphy, Hayden’s granddaughter, was the last of the girls to finish decorating her bag.

Overall, she said she was happy with how her bag turned out and was looking forward to making more in the future.

Plus, her work for foster children is only beginning.

“I don’t know why, but I’ve always wanted to be a foster parent. It’s a special feeling. But I just think that every kid needs a home,” she said.

Just like her grandmother.

Astead W. Herndon can be reached at astead.herndon@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @AsteadWH